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Machines & Consoles

Machines & Consoles Machines & Consoles

Machines & ConsolesAlthough we've seen the occasional gizmo constructed using bits from circuit boards and the innards from pens, Froggy the Great is something of a master of the art. He has in fact created far too many of these wonderful contraptions for us to describe in detail, so instead we shall concentrate our efforts on giving an overview and refer you to our gallery where Froggy has created an album for your viewing pleasure called: The Mad Scientist's Lab.

While electronics components, salvaged from the circuit boards from old radios and televisions sets form the basis of Froggy's machines along with bits of styrene, and dress-makers pins, many other small items find their way in there too. In fact there's a lot of fun to be had from looking at Froggy's work and playing "spot the bits". It's not at all easy though because Froggy seems to find a mind boggling variety of ways to transform everyday bits and pieces, but we think we've spotted: GW figure bases, bottle tops, map pins, Lego parts, vending machine capsules and popsicle sticks.

Machines & Consoles Machines & Consoles

It's interesting to note the way that Froggy's repeated use of some materials such as the electronics components and dress making pins helps to give consistency to the models, and gives the impression that, although all of the machines different, they are all using the same kind of technology. In the same way that steam powered, or electrical machines have a look about them that identifies them as one or the other, Froggy's machines look like they share common technological principles. Quite what that technology is and what these machines do is anybody's guess, but they look like they probably do something.

Machines & ConsolesNow we anticipate that amongst our readers there will be a good number who are thinking to themselves "I wish I had a great collection of bits to make things like that" however the real skill is in recognising those bits. They are all around us but, as illustrated by the picture to the right, they can look like a pile of junk to the untrained eye. With the application of a little paint however, that overly colourful pile of bits, becomes a crucial part of the diabolical machine which the young lady appears reluctant to test in the image below. Note however that Froggy has not obliterated the colours of the components but has toned them down with the judicious application of black washes and silver drybrushing such that elements of the original colour, and any interesting markings on the components, shows through in the finished model. As with his choice of materials, Froggy's repetitive use of black and silver paint also aids in giving machines a consistent style.

Machines & Consoles

Machines & ConsolesFroggy also has a nice line in blue coloured display screens, and keypads created from dots of paint. In these extreme close-ups it could be argued that they do not look as tidy as the might using a decal or printed panel, however Froggy's method is an awful lot quicker and fits very well with the style of the models. Once again the consistency of his techniques and choice of colours on the different machines gives them a coherent look.

And before you ask, because we know you're going to, the lady with the crossbow is Tara the Silent by Reaper Miniatures. The reluctant lady volunteer is also from Reaper while the mad scientist and his male assistant (who you'll get a better look at in the The Mad Scientist's Lab album that we mentioned earlier), are from RAFM's Call of Cthulhu range.

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